All posts filed under: cosmetic ingredients

Olive Oil: on Your Skin or in Your Plate?

Olive oil is an emollient — a moisturising agent able to reduce water loss and cover the skin with a protective film, and it can also penetrate deeply into the skin. For many years, olive oil has been used to care for dry skin. It was believed that the application of pure oil would soften and nourish dry thinning skin, make it more resilient and elastic, restore its protective properties. However latest research has demonstrated that olive oil should not be used as a primary skin care solution, for its effect would be quite the contrary of what you’d expect. Olive oil contains quite a lot of oleic acid which can gradually dissolve the lipid layer of the epidermis thus weakening the skin’s barrier function. The skin then loses its own natural ability to retain water, dries up and becomes thin. If the skin is healthy to begin with, applying olive oil for a relatively short period of time (up to 9 months) does not normally cause any side effects. But even then one should …

Dimethicone Debate

Dimethicone: What does this word mean? Some easily impressible journalists and bloggers seem to think that it’s something really terrible that should not ever be used in cosmetic skincare. Let’s look into it, shall we.  Dimethicone’s chemical name sounds rather intimidating—Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). It is a polymer—a substance that consists of many identical molecules. Polymers are not necessarily synthesised—they can be organic too, and a lot of them are present in the human body, hyaluronic acid being one of them. Maple syrup and cane sugar are made up by polymers as well. So, we’ve established that dimethicone is a polymer. It is made up by a large number of molecules, all identical and based on silicone [O-Si(CH3)2]n. This makes dimethicone basically an organic silicone. It is an optically clear, inert and scentless silicone oil. So what makes dimethicone so attractive to cosmetic manufacturers? It is, first of all, its incredible stability. Dimethicone does not go bad in cold or hot temperatures, it is not affected by UV-radiation, it stops bacterial and fungal reproduction, and it is environmentally friendly—what’s not …