Author: drmeder

Former Catholic Monk Takes L’Oreal to Court!

A former Roman Catholic monk has sued L’Oréal over the use of the anti-ageing skin care ingredient adenosine, which he says he holds the exclusive license to. Brother Dennis Wyrzykowski of the Teresian Carmelites – a non-profit organisation that was formerly recognised by the Catholic Church until 2008 – launched an anti-ageing facial moisturiser in 2009 called Easamine. Selling Easamine through his for-profit subsidiary Carmel Labs, Wyrzykowski raised funds for the Teresian Carmelites and its charitable programmes. Carmel Labs was given the exclusive license to use adenosine technology, covered by two patents, for all cosmetic applications in 2008. The license agreement arose due to an ongoing relationship between the religious order and Dr James Jobson, Jr, the former Chairman of the Department of Physiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Read full article at CosmeticBusiness.com

Olive Oil: on Your Skin or in Your Plate?

Olive oil is an emollient — a moisturising agent able to reduce water loss and cover the skin with a protective film, and it can also penetrate deeply into the skin. For many years, olive oil has been used to care for dry skin. It was believed that the application of pure oil would soften and nourish dry thinning skin, make it more resilient and elastic, restore its protective properties. However latest research has demonstrated that olive oil should not be used as a primary skin care solution, for its effect would be quite the contrary of what you’d expect. Olive oil contains quite a lot of oleic acid which can gradually dissolve the lipid layer of the epidermis thus weakening the skin’s barrier function. The skin then loses its own natural ability to retain water, dries up and becomes thin. If the skin is healthy to begin with, applying olive oil for a relatively short period of time (up to 9 months) does not normally cause any side effects. But even then one should …

Getting Under Your Skin

I develop cosmetics for a living specialising on topical skin care as opposed to injectables and other invasive solutions. In my professional life I am quite often asked, How does a cream even penetrate into the skin? Doesn’t it just stay on the surface (being therefore useless)? Most popular opinions on the subject are: Nothing gets inside the skin, because it is our impenetrable protective barrier (and therefore you need to stick needles in your face and inject things or use laser, dermabrasion and radio waves to achieve any kind of effect), or; Only very expensive cosmetics would be able to penetrate into the skin. Here’s how it all really works. One of the skin’s primary functions is indeed protection, and not every substance would be able to get through this barrier. But it’s not impenetrable either. Your skin is not a space suit that can only be pierced with a needle or a laser beam. There are substances, dermatological medicinal creams among them, that are able to get so deep through the skin that …

The How’s and Why’s of Thermal Water

  Thermal water is basically mineral water from thermal springs. If you’ve ever seen a hot spring gushing out from under ground, then you’ve seen a source of thermal water. Usually the water rises up from the deep underground basins where the geothermal and volcanic activity of the Earth heats it up. Thermal springs can differ significantly first of all in their salt composition. It is these salts dissolved in water that determine the biological activity of thermal water and the effect it has on the skin.Practically any kind of thermal water has a more or less powerful hydrating action: the saline Practically any kind of thermal water has a more or less powerful hydrating action: the saline solution acts like a magnet retaining water in the upper skin layers. However, the moisturising effect will be more pronounced if the skin’s surface is not allowed to dry. If the evaporation is not slowed down, soon after the initial comfortable and softening sensation the skin will start feeling tight and dry which is perceived by many …