Month: March 2016

Teenage Acne Today

1. Why do teenagers get acne? We’ve always thought that it’s because of the puberty hormones, but recently some cosmetologists have been rejecting this theory. What do you think? Dr Meder: It is impossible to deny the role of the hormone changes in the development of acne. It has been scientifically proven that adolescent acne is caused primarily by hormonal changes. The intensifying of the hormonal syntheses and the increase both in the skin’s sensitivity to androgens and in the amount of dihydrotestosterone in the skin enhance the production of sebum and cause the change in its properties, bringing about inflammatory elements in the skin. 2. This problem used to affect 13–14 year old boys and girls, but now we see them getting acne at 11 or 12. Why do you think that is? Dr Meder: Accelerated growth is not a myth—modern kids grow up faster and enter puberty sooner. 3. What kinds of acne are there? Dr Meder: This is a rather comprehensive topic. If we’re still talking about teenagers, modern classification goes as follows: …

Botox Can Affect Your Emotions

It has long been suggested that feedback signals from facial muscles influence emotional experience. The recent surge in use of botulinum toxin (BTX) to induce temporary muscle paralysis offers a unique opportunity to directly test this “facial feedback hypothesis.” Previous research shows that the lack of facial muscle feedback due to BTX-induced paralysis influences subjective reports of emotional experience, as well as brain activity associated with the imitation of emotional facial expressions. However, it remains to be seen whether facial muscle paralysis affects brain activity, especially the amygdala, which is known to be responsive to the perception of emotion in others. Further, it is unknown whether these neural changes are permanent or whether they revert to their original state after the effects of BTX have subsided. The present study sought to address these questions by using functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural responses to angry and happy facial expressions in the presence or absence of facial paralysis. Results Consistent with previous research, amygdala activity was greater in response to angry compared to happy faces …